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AIM OF THE PROJECT

This website is meant to celebrate and promote the work of the British philosopher and historian of science Mary B. Hesse.

I published its first version on the occasion of Hesse's 2002 birthday, in sincere gratitude for the support and encouragement I received from her during my studies: both when I was writing my dissertation on her philosophical views at the turn of the millenium and as I was going through a difficult time at the University of Cambridge in late 2001. I keep dear momories of all our conversations and meetings: from our first encounter, when she warmingly received me at her place and gave me the opportunity to interview her extensively, through our chats over lunch at Wolfsan College, to the last time I had a chance to see her, at the Cambridge HPS department, on the occasion of the celebrations for the honorary degree that was conferred on her by the University of Cambridge in June 2002.

I redesigned the website in 2004 and substantially updated it in 2011. However, it remained partly unfinished and largely unpolished. In late 2014, Hesse's 90th birthday and some hopeful signs of a rising interest for her work prompted me to develop the current, mobile-friendly and further updated version. Though remaining an ongoing project, it is now in an acceptably stable condition.

The Biographical Notes section provides an introduction to Hesse's intellectual trajectory, an overview of her education and academic career and a list of noteworthy lectures and lecture series delivered by Hesse throughout her career. The Chronological Bibliography section orders Hesse's published works by publication year but includes only the first appeareance in print of the original version of any work (no reprints or translations are indicated). The Annotated Bibliography section orders Hesse's published works by publication type and purportedly includes all published versions and translations of any of her works. It provides the tables of contents of Hesse's volumes and a list of their reviews that appeared in scholarly journals as well as short notes specifying relevant information on several other publications. The Critical Bibliography sections offers a list of secondary literature on Hesse's life and work.


Please sign the Guestbook and contact me for any suggestion, correction, or contribution, being them either integrations or updates.


Useful links

Mary Hesse Personal Webpage as Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College (University of Cambridge)

 

 

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES

Introduction

Mary B. [Brenda] Hesse was born in Reigate on 15 October 1924. She took a BSc in special mathematics at Imperial College of Science and Technology in London in 1945. One year later she received an MSc from the same college and shortly thereafter she continued her education at University College London (UCL). In 1948 Mary Hesse defended her doctoral thesis on electron microscopy and received her PhD. She also holds an MSc in the history and philosophy of science from UCL (1950). In July 2002 she was apoointed Doctor of Science honoris causa at the University of Cambridge.

Hesse's university career began when she accepted a position as lecturer in mathematics in 1951 at the University of Leeds. From 1955 to 1959 she taught at the University of London as lecturer in the history and philosophy of science. In 1960 she began her long and distinguished association with Cambridge University. She was first appointed lecturer in history and philosophy of science, and in 1968 university reader in philosophy of science. In 1975 she was appointed to the position of Professor of Philosophy of Science at the History and Philosophy of Science (HPS), Cambridge, which she continued to hold until 1985, when she took early retirement.

Between 1965 and 1969 she was Vice-President of the British Society for the History of Science and the editor of the British Journal for Phiosophy of Science. She is a fellow of Wolfson College, Cambridge, of which she was Vice-President (1976-80). She became a fellow of the British Academy in 1971 and was elected President of the Philosophy of Science Association in 1979. She has been a member on numeorus committees as well as visiting professor on several occasions in the United States.

Mary Hesse's work demonstrated a lifelong commitment to philosophical issues in both natural and social science. Her scientific training provided her a profound respect for science as theory and practice. She devoted much of her subsequent work to those issues in philosophy of science that engaged her generation: logical questions about science, the relationship between theory and observation, and methods and foundational assumptions. Hesse took a critical stance against the hypothetico-deductive theory of scientific justification advocated by, among others, Karl Popper, and argued in favour of an inductivist view of science, then undervalued by many philosophers. According to Hesse, inductive inferences are more complex tha deductive inferences. She emphasized three particular types of inductive inference that have played a crucial role in both contemporary science and in the science of the past. These three forms may be referred to as inferences based on analogies, on models and on metaphors. [406|407]

One of her suggestions is that models in science are resources for a metaphorical redescription of what is being observed or experimented upon. The essentially inductive model of science that she developed - later referred to as the 'Hesse-net' - owes much to the network model first oulined by Duhem and adopted by Quine. This model interprets scientific theory in terms of a network of concepts related by laws, in which only pragmatic and relative distinctions can be made between the 'observable' and the 'theoretical'. In The structure of scientific inference (1974) Hesse argues that the network model of theories is more adequate than previous attempts at relating observation language to theoretical language. Here one can also note her interest in the non-formal, non-technical aspects of understanding scientific work. Science is not very different from other creative or intellectual practices. She compares the way networks are built up with the way 'M. Black suggests a poet builds up a web of imagined associations within the poem itself in order to make new metaphors intelligible" (Structure of Scientific Inference, p. 32).

Hesse, like N.R. Hanson, T.S. Kuhn and P.K. Feyerabend, among others, has a broad outlook on matters concerning science. She positions herself within the post-empiricist tradition, where the influence from Duhem and Quine is significant. Of particular importance is the thesis of the Underdetermination of theories by empirical data, often referred to as the Duhem-Quine thesis - meaning that several theories may capture the same data and that there is in principle an indefinite number of theories that fit the observed facts more or less adequately. According to Hesse, this thesis, together with the turn in philosophy of science from logical models to historical models and some important historically-oriented work, has caused a revolution in the philosophy of science. This fundamental change, called post-empiricism, encompasses ideas about relationship between theories and observations, and about language and the logic of science; it admits social factors in explaining science, which she finds plausible, but is also open to the charge or relativism, which she fundamentally rejects.

Another important theme in her philosophical writings is the claim that the philosophy of science must be integrated with the history of science. 'In writing the history of science there will always be present, either implicitly or explicitly some philosophical view of the nature of science', Hesse states as early as the Preface of her widely read and much valued Forces and Fields (1961). In this book, a historical study of physics, Hesse devotes a considerable amount of space to pre-seventeenth century work, particularly to the Greeks. To trace the history of scientific ideas and their relations with philosophy is a general aim of her work. In this sense Hesse's view is similar to those of Kuhn and Feyerabend, and like them she uses examples from the history of science both to question and to clarify philosophical problems. The combined interest in history and philosophy of science emphasizes contingency and ontextualism, and offers empirical support to the thesis of underdetermination.

Mary Hesse's work manifests both continuity and change. Throughout her writings her view of the essential role of analogies, models and metaphors in science persists. Her interest in the hermeneutical aspects of all intellectual work is another recurring theme. In her later writings, she has turned her attention to new areas, such as the social sciences and to the sociology of scientific knowledge (in Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science, 1980) were of major importance to the recongnition of sociological approaches to the understanding of science in society. Her open mind and intellectual curiosity are also shown in her way of taking feminist concerns into consideration. Although she has never defined herslef a feminist, she took feminist challenges to [407|408] science seriously and in the 1990s she wrote about and analysed the critique of mainstream philosophy of science from a gendered point of view.

Hesse was an Anglican and took much interest in questions of science and religion. In her retirement she devoted her time and curiosity to landscape history and published several articles on this subject. In her last years, she suffered from a neurodegenerative disease and passed away on 2 October 2016.


Source: Slighly adapted and updated from Margareta Hallberg, "Mary Brenda Hesse" in The Dictionary of Twentieth-Century British Philosophers, Stuart Brown (ed.), Thoemmes Continuum: Bristol 2005, Vol. 1, pp. 406-408. [Courtesy of Margareta Hallberg and Thoemmes Continuum]



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Education and Academic Career

Born in Reigate (Sussex), 15 October 1924


BSc in Mathematics, Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London, 1947

MSc, Imperial College of Science and Technology, University of London, 1948 [Dissertation on N. A. Whitehead, discussed with the physicist Herbert Dingle]

PhD, University College London, University ofLondon, 1949 [Thesis on electron microscopy]

Currently studying at the Institute of Continuing Education, Madingley Hall, University of Cambridge


Lecturer in Mathematics, Royal Holloway College, University of London, 1947-1951

Lecturer in Mathematics, University of Leeds, 1951-1955


Lecturer in History and Philosophy of Science, University College, University of London, 1955-1959


Lecturer in the Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 1960-1968

Member of the Council of Senate, 1962-1966

Visiting Professor at Yale University, 1962-1963

Visiting Professor at the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Minnesota, 1966


University Reader in the Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 1968-1975

Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago, 1968

Visiting Professor at the University of Notre Dame, 1972


Professor of Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 1975-1985

Vice-President, Wolfson College, University of Cambridge, 1976-1980

Stanton Lecturer, University of Cambridge, 1978-1980

Gifford Lecturer, University of Edinburgh, 1983

Doctor of Science honoris causa, University of Hull, 1984


Professor Emerita of the Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, 1986-present

Doctor of Science honoris causa, University of Guelph, 1987

Doctor of Science honoris causa, University of Cambridge, 2002



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Noteworthy Lectures and Lecture Series

Lecture Series, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame (IN) 1971

Models of 19th Century Science
Poincaré & Duhem
The Idealist Image of Science: Quine
Empiricism without Privilege
Ontology Naturalized

[Audio recordings available at the University of Notre Dame Archives, Department of Philosophy Audio-Video Material, ADPL C3112-C3114]

Stanton Lectures (on the Philosophy of Religion), Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge, Cambridge 1978-1980

Science and Religion: some epistemological problems (1978)

1. Truth and the ‘Alphabet of Nature’
2. Realists, relativists, and the growth of knowledge
3. Emergence and evaluation
4. Facts, values, and meaning
5. Habermas’ consensus theory of truth
6. Miracles and the problem of providence
7. Metaphor and the attributes of God
8. Myth and truth

Social Construction and Religious Reality (1979)

1. The new science-religion debate
2. Society id God
3. Religious representations
4. From function to meaning
5. Totems and techniques
6. Decoding symbolism
7. The mediation of paradoxes
8. Religious reality

Science, Religion, and Symbolism (1980)


Gifford Lectures, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh 1983

[Published in Michael A. Arbib and Mary B. Hesse, The Construction of Reality, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1986, Chs 1, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11]


‘What is the Point of Pointer-readings?’, Paper prepared for the workshop “Contexts of Dialogue for the Formation of Quantitative Concepts in Science”, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem 1986

 

 

CHRONOLOGICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

This section orders Hesse's published works by publication year but includes only the first appeareance in print of the original version of any work (no reprints or translations are indicated). For any further detail, please see the Annotated Bibliography.

1950

1952

  1. "Operational Definition and Analogy in Physical Theories", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 2: 8 (February 1952), 281-294.
  2. "Boole’s Philosophy of Logic", Annals of Science, 8: 1 (March 1952), 61-81.

1953

  1. "Models in Physics", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 198-214.
  2. Review of [Edward A. Milne, Sir James Jeans: A Biography, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1952], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 254-256.
  3. Review of [George Boole, Studies in Logic and Probability, R. Rhees (ed.), Watts and Co.: London 1952], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 262-264.

1954

  1. "Action at a Distance", Abstract, Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Science, 1: 10 (May 1954), Philosophy of Science Group, Supplement Number 8, 257-258.
  2. Science and the Human Imagination: Aspects of the History and Logic of Physical Science, SCM Press: London 1954, 171 pp.

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1955

1956

  1. Review of [René Boirel, Science et technique, Éditions du Griffon: Neuchatel (CH) 1955], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 7: 27 (November 1956), 269.
  2. Review of [Hans Reichenbach, The Rise of Scientific Philosophy, University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles 1956], Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Science, 2: 15 (December 1956), 52-53.

1957

1958

  1. Review of [Ernest H. Hutten, The Language of Modern Physics, George Allen & Unwin: London and Macmillan: New York 1956], Philosophy, 33: 124 (January 1958), 74-75.
  2. "Theories, Dictionaries, and Observation", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 33 (May 1958), 12-28.
  3. "A Note on 'Theories, Dictionaries, and Observation'", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 34 (August 1958), 128-129.
  4. Review of [Ernest Nagel, Logic without Metaphysics, and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science, The Free Press: Glencoe (IL) 1956], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 35 (November 1958), 248-249.

1959

  1. Review of [Harold Jeffreys, Scientific Inference, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1957 (Second edition)], Philosophy, 34: 128 (January 1959), 66-68.
  2. Review of [Max Jammer, Concepts of Force: A Study in the Foundations of Dynamics,Harvard University Press: Cambridge (MA) and Oxford University Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 10: 37 (May 1959), 69-73.
  3. Review of [Stephen Toulmin, Ronald W. Hepburn and Alasdair MacIntyre, Metaphysical Beliefs: Three Essays, SCM Press: London 1957] and of [Michael B. Foster, Mystery and Philosophy, SCM Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 10: 37 (May 1959), 73-78.

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1960

  1. "Gilbert and the Historians (I)", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 41 (May 1960), 1-10.
  2. "Gilbert and the Historians (II)", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 42 (August 1960), 130-142.
  3. Review of [Stephen F. Barker, Induction and Hypothesis: A Study of the Logic of confirmation, Cornell University Press: Ithaca (NY) and Oxford University Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 42 (August 1960), 164-166.
  4. Review of [Mario Bunge, Causality - The Place of the Causal Principle in Modern Science, Harvard University Press: Cambridge (MA) and Oxford University Press: London 1959], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 43 (November 1960), 252-255.
  5. "On Defining Analogy", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 60 (1959-1960), 79-100.

1961

  1. "Models and Matter" [Part of the series "Quanta and Reality"], BBC Radio 3, 24 May 1961, 8:00 pm (20 min.).
  2. Review of [Ralph M. Blake, Curt J. Ducasse and Edward H. Madden, Theories of Scientific Method: The Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century, Edward H. Madden (ed.), University of Washington Press: Seattle 1960], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 12: 46 (August 1961), 173-176.
  3. Forces and Fields: A Study of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics, Thomas Nelson and Sons: London 1961, x+318 pp.

1962

  1. "On What There Is in Physics", Review of [Rom Harré, Theories and Things, Sheed & Ward: London 1961], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 13: 51 (November 1962), 234-244.
  2. "Models and Matter" in Quanta and Reality, S. E. Toulmin (ed.), Hutchinson: London 1962, pp. 49-57.
  3. Review of [M. Hoskin, William Herschel, Sheed & Ward: London 1959; J. A. Weisheipl, The Development of Physical Theory in the Middle Ages, Sheed & Ward: London 1959; L. K. Clark, Pioneers of Prehistory in England, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; G. Buchdahl, The Image of Newton and Locke in the Age of Reason, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; D. F. Pocock, Social Anthropology, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; E. F. Caldin, The Structure of Chemistry, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; R. Harré, Theories and Things, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; all volumes published within the Newman History and Philosophy of Science Series], History of Science, 1 (1962), 115-117.
  4. "Subjunctive conditionals II", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volumes, 36 (1962), 201-214.
  5. "History and Philosophy of Science in the Early Natural Sciences Tripos", The Cambridge Review, 84 (1962), 140-145.
  6. "History of Physics" in American Oxford Encyclopedia, Vol. III, J. J. Little & Ives: New York 1962, pp. ???.

1963

  1. Review of [Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Chicago University Press: Chicago 1962], Isis, 54: 2 (June 1963), 286-287.
  2. Review of [Ernest Nagel, The Structure of Science: Problems in the Logic of Scientific Explanation, Routledge & Kegan Paul: London 1961], Mind, N.S. 72: 287 (July 1963), 429-441.
  3. "Analogy and Confirmation Theory", Dialectica, 17: 2-3 (September 1963), 284-295.
  4. "A New Look at Scientific Explanation", Review of Metaphysics, 17: 1 (September 1963), 98-108.
  5. Review of [Milič Čapek, The Philosophical Impact of Contemporary Physics, Van Nostrand: London 1962], The Philosophical Quarterly, 13: 53 (October 1963), 379-381.
  6. Models and Analogies in Science, Sheed and Ward: London 1963, 150 pp.
  7. "Action at a Distance" in The Concept of Matter, E. McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1963, pp. 372-390.
  8. "Measurement in Science", Essay Review [Quantification: A History of the Meaning of Measurement in the Natural and Social Sciences, Harry Woolf (ed.), Bobbs-Merrill: Indianapolis (IN) 1961], History of Science, 2 (1963), 152-155.
  9. Commentary on "Intellectual Actors in the Background of Analysis by Probabilities" by C. C. Gillespie, in Scientific Change, A. C. Crombie (ed.), Heinemann: London and Basic Books: New York 1963, pp. 471-476.

1964

  1. "Induction and Theory-structure", Review of Metaphysics, 18: 1 (September 1964), 109-122.
  2. "Analogy and Confirmation Theory", Philosophy of Science, 31: 4 (October 1964), 319-327.
  3. "Resource Letter PhM-1 on Philosophical Foundations of Classical Mechanics", American Journal of Physics, 32: 12 (December 1964), 905-911.
  4. "Francis Bacon" in A Critical History of Western Philosophy, D. J. O’Connor (ed.), Free Press of Glencoe: New York and Macmillan: London 1964, pp. 141-152.
  5. "Hooke’s Development of Bacon's Method" in Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of the History of Science, Hermann: Paris 1964, pp. 265-258.
  6. "Changing Views of Matter", Essay Review [The Concept of Matter, Ernan McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1963], History of Science, 3 (1964), 79-84.

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1965

  1. Review of [Philosophy of Science: The Delaware Seminar, Vol. I: 1961-1962 by Bernard Baumrin (ed.), John Wiley (Interscience): New York and London 1962], The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 58 (January 1965), 87-89.
  2. "Aristotle’s Logic of Analogy", The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 61 (October 1965), 328-340.
  3. Review of [Karl R. Popper, Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge, Routledge: London 1963], The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 61 (October 1965), 372-374.
  4. "The Explanatory Function of Metaphor" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science: Proceedings of the 1964 International Congress, Y. Bar-Hillel (ed.), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1966, pp. 249-259.
  5. "Miracles and the Laws of Nature" in Miracles, C. F. D. Moule (ed.), A. R. Mowbray & Co: London 1965, pp. 33-42.
  6. "Statistical Methods for Inductive logic", Cambridge Research, 1 (1965), 27-30.

1966

  1. "The Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science", Review of [Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, volume 2, Robert S. Cohen and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), Humanities Press: New York 1965], Science, N.S. 152: 3724 (13 May 1966), 918.
  2. "Hooke’s Philosophical Algebra", Isis, 57: 1 (Spring 1966), 67-83.
  3. Review of [Rom Harré, Matter and Method, Macmillan & Co.: London 1964], The Philosophical Review, 75: 3 (July 1966), 398-400.
  4. Review of [Form and Strategy in Science: Studies Dedicated to Joseph Henry Woodger on the Occasion of his Seventieth Birthday, John R. Gregg and F. T. C. Harris (eds.), Reidel: Dordrecht 1964], The Philosophical Quarterly, 16: 65 (October 1966), 405-406.
  5. "Hooke's Vibration Theory and the Isochrony of Springs", Isis, 57: 4 (Winter 1966), 433-441.
  6. Models and Analogies in Science, Notre Dame University Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1966, pp. 184.

1967

  1. Review of [Carl G. Hempel, Aspects of Scientific Explanation; And Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science, The Free Press: New York and Collier-Macmillan: London 1965], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 18: 1 (May 1967), pp. 67-70.
  2. Review of [Robert H. Kargon, Atomism in England from Hariot to Newton, Clarendon Press: Oxford 1966], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 58: 1 (Spring 1967), pp. 123-124.
  3. Review of [L. Pearce Williams, The Origins of Field Theory, Random House: New York 1966], Isis, 18: 2 (August 1967), pp. 330-335.
  4. Review of [Beyond the Edge of Certainty: Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy, Robert G. Colodny (ed.), Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs (NJ) 1965], Ratio, 9 (1967), 91-93.
  5. "Galileo and the Conflict of Realism and Empiricism' in Atti del Symposium Internazionale di Storia, Metodologia, Logica e Filosofia della Scienza 'Galileo nella Storia e nella Filosofia della Scienza', Manifestazioni celebrative del IV centenario della nascita di Galileo (Florence - Pisa, 14-16 September 1964), Gruppo Italiano di Storia delle Scienze: Vinci 1967, pp. 283-28(7)9.
  6. "Action at a Distance and Field Theory' in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. I, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 9-15.
  7. "Ether" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. III, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 66-69.
  8. "Laws and Theories" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. IV, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 404-410.
  9. "Models and Analogy in Science" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. V, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 354-359.
  10. "Simplicity" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. VII, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 445-448.
  11. "Void" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. VIII, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 217-218.

1968

  1. "Fine’s Criteria for Meaning Change", Journal of Philosophy, 65: 2 (25 January 1968), 46-52.
  2. Review of [Mind, Matter, and Method. Essays in honour of H. Feigl, Paul K. Feyerabend and Grover Maxwell (eds.), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1966, part II: Induction, Confirmation, and Philosophical Method], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 18: 4 (February 1968), pp. 330-335.
  3. Review of [Israel Scheffler, Science and Subjectivity, Bobbs-Merrill: Indianapolis (IN) 1967], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 19: 2 (August 1968), 176-177.
  4. "A Self-correcting Observation Language" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science III: Proceedings of the Third International Congress for Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Amsterdam 1967, B. van Rootselaar and J. F. Stahl (eds), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1968, pp. 297-309.
  5. "Consilience of Inductions" in The Problem of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of the International Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 2: Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, I. Lakatos (ed.), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1968, pp. 232-246 and pp. 254-257.

1969

  1. "Ramifications of 'Grue'", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 20: 1 (May 1969), 13-25.
  2. Review Article of [Talk of God: Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, Vol. 2 (1967-1968), Macmillan: London and St. Martin's Press: New york 1969], Philosophy, 44: 170 (October 1969), 343-349.
  3. Review of [The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Paul Edwards (ed.), Macmillan and The Free Press: New York and Collier-Macmillan: London 1967], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 20: 3 (October 1969), 13-25.
  4. "Confirmation of Laws" in Philosophy, Science and Method: Essays in Honor of Ernest Nagel, S. Morgenbesser, P. Suppes and M. White (eds), St. Martin’s Press: New York 1969, pp. 74-79.
  5. "Positivism and the Logic of Scientific Theories" in The Legacy of Logical Positivism for the Philosophy of Science, P. Achinstein and S. Barker (eds), Johns Hopkins Press: Baltimore (Md.) 1969, pp. 85-114.

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1970

  1. "Theories and the Transitivity of Confirmation", Philosophy of Science, 37: 1 (March 1970), 50-63.
  2. Review of [Pierre Duhem, To save the Phenomena, University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London 1969], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 21: 3 (August 1970), 303-304.
  3. "An Inductive Logic of Theories" in Analyses of Theories and Methods of Physics and Psychology, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. IV, M. Radner and S. Winokur (eds), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1970, pp. 164-80.
  4. "Duhem, Quine, and a New Empiricism" in Knowledge and Necessity, Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, Vol. 3, G. Vesey (ed.), Macmillan: London and St. Martin's Press: New York 1970, pp. 191-209.
  5. "Is There an Independent Observation Language?" in The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories, Robert G. Colodny (ed.), University of Pittsburgh Press: Pittsburgh 1970, pp. 35-77.
  6. "Hermeticism and Historiography: An Apology for the Internal History of Science" in Historical and Philosophical Perspective of Science, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. V, R. H. Stuewer (ed.), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1970, pp. 134-160.
  7. Comment on "On the Notion of Field in Newton, Maxwell, and Beyond" by Howard Stein, in Historical and Philosophical Perspective of Science, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. V, Roger H. Stuewer (ed.), University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1970, p. 298.
  8. "Francis Bacon" in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, C. C. Gillespie (ed.), Scribner: New York 1970, Vol. 1, pp. 372-377.

1971

1972

1973

  1. "Reasons and Evaluations in the History of Science" in Changing Perspectives in the History of Science, M. Teich and R. M. Young (eds), Heinemann Educational Books: London 1973, pp. 127-147.
  2. "Logic of Discovery in Maxwell’s Electromagnetic Theory" in Foundations of Scientific Method in the Nineteenth Century, R. N. Giere and R. S. Westfall (eds), Indiana University Press: Bloomington (IN) 1973, 86-114.
  3. "Models of Theory-change" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science IV: Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress, Bucharest, Rumania, August 29-September 4, 1971, P. Suppes, L. Henkin, A. Joja and Gr. C. Moisil (eds), North-Holland Publishing Company: Amsterdam 1973, pp. 379-391.
  4. "In Defence of Objectivity", 1972 Annual Philosophical Lecture, Proceedings of the British Academy, 58 (1973), 275-292.

1974

  1. Review of [Leszek Kolakowski, The Alienation of Reason: A History of Positivist Thought, Anchor Books (Doubleday): Garden City (NY) 1969], Isis, 65: 1 (March 1974), 103-104.
  2. Review of [Peter Achinstein, Law and Explanation: An Essay in the Philosophy of Science, Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1971], Isis, 65: 2 (June 1974), 259-260.
  3. Review of [Michael Krausz, Critical Essays on the Philosophy of R. G. Collingwood, Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1972], Isis, 65: 2 (June 1974), 290.
  4. Review of [Maurice A. Finocchiaro, History of Science as Explanation, Wayne State University Press: Detroit 1973], The British Journal for the History of Science, 7: 2 (July 1974), 180-182.
  5. Review of [John Losee, A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, Oxford University Press: Oxford, London, New York 1972], Isis, 65: 3 (September 1974), 402-403.
  6. Review of [Martin Strauss, Modern Physics and Its Philosophy, Reidel: Dordrecht 1972], Isis, 65: 3 (September 1974), 404.
  7. Review of [The Problem of Scientific Realism, Edward A. MacKinnon (ed.), Appleton-Century-Crofts: New York 1972], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 528.
  8. Review of [Philosophy, Science, and Method: Essays in Honor of Ernest Nagel, Sidney Morgenbesser, Patrick Suppes and Morton White (eds.), St. Martin's Press: New York 1969], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 528-529.
  9. Review of [Mendel Sachs, The Field Concept in Contemporary Science, Charles C. Thomas: Springfield (IL) 1973], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 529.
  10. The Structure of Scientific Inference, Macmillan, London and University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles 1974, pp. vii+309.
  11. "Method in Maxwell's Electrodynamics", Proceedings of the XIII International Congress in the History of Science, Section VI, Moscow, August 18-24 1971, Nauka: Moscow 1974, pp. 14-21.
  12. "Worlds, Selves and Theories", Cambridge Review, 95 (1974), 62-65.

^

1975

  1. "Bayesianism and Scientific Inference", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 5: 4 (February 1975), 267-272.
  2. Review of [Stephen Lukes, Émile Durkheim, His Life and Work: A Historical and Critical Study, Harper & Row: New York 1972], Isis, 66: 2 (June 1975), 288.
  3. "Criteria of Truth in Science and Theology", Religious Studies, 11: 4 (1 December 1975), 385-400.
  4. Comment on "The Object of Explantion" by P. Achinstein, in Explanation, S. Körner (ed.), Basil Blackwell: Oxford and Yale University Press: New Haven (CT) 1975, pp. 45-54.
  5. "Bayesian Methods and the Initial Probabilities of Theories" in Induction, Probability, and Confirmation, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. VI, G. Maxwell and R. M. Anderson (eds), University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1975, pp. 50-105.
  6. "Lonergan and Method in the Natural Sciences" in Looking at Lonergan's Method, P. Corcoran (ed.), Gill and MacMillan: Dublin 1975, pp. 59-72.
  7. "On the Alleged Incompatibility between Christianity and Science" in Man and Nature, H. Montefiore (ed.), Collins: London 1975, pp. 121-131.
  8. "Models of Method in the Natural and Social Sciences", Methodology and Science, 8 (1975), 163-178.

1976

  1. "Peacocke's 'Reductionism'", Discussion, Zygon, 11: 4 (December 1976), 335-337.
  2. Review of [Ian Hacking, The Emergence of Probability: A Philosophical Study of Early Ideas about Probability, Induction and Statistical Inference, Cambridge University Pess: London and New York 1975], Isis, 67: 4 (December 1976), 288.
  3. "Truth and the Growth of Scientific Knowledge" in PSA 1976: Proceedings of the 1976 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, F. Suppe and P. D. Asquith (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1976, pp. 261-280.
  4. "Models versus Paradigms in the Natural Sciences" in The Use of Models in the Social Sciences, L. Collins (ed.), Tavistock: London and Westview Press: Boulder (CO) 1976, pp. 1-15.

1978

  1. "Theory and Value in the Social Sciences" in Action and Interpretation: Studies in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences, C. Hookway and P. Pettit (eds), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge and New York 1978, pp. 1-16.
  2. "Introduction" in Human Implications of Scientific Advance: Proceedings of the XV International Congress of the History of Science, E. G. Forbes (ed.), Edinburgh University Press: Edinburgh 1978, pp. 59-63.
  3. "Habermas' Consensus Theory of Truth" in PSA 1978: Proceedings of the 1978 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and I. Hacking (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1981, pp. 373-396.

1979

  1. "The Ideological and Theological Debate about Science: Introduction and a Statement of the Issues", Anticipation: Christian social thought in future perspective, 25 (January 1979), 4-5 and 8-11.
  2. Commentray on "The Preconditions of Experience and the Unity of Physics" by C. F. von Weizsäcker in Transcendental Arguments and Science, P. Bieri, R. P. Horstmann and L. Krüger (eds), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1979, pp. 159-170.

^

1980

  1. "Minogue on Intensional Reference", Philosophy of Science, 47: 4 (December 1980), 617-625.
  2. Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science, The Harvester Press: Brighton and Indiana University Press: Bloomington (Ind.) 1980.
  3. "What Is the Best Way to Assess Evidential Support for Scientific Theories?" in Applications of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of a Conference at the Queen's College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978, L. J. Cohen and M. B. Hesse (eds), Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1980, pp. 202-217.
  4. Comment on "Properties, Causation, and Projectibility" by S. S. Shoemaker in Applications of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of a Conference at the Queen's College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978, L. J. Cohen and M. B. Hesse (eds), Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1980, pp. 329-330.
  5. "A Revised Regularity View of Scientific Laws" in Science, Belief and Behaviour: Essays in Honour of R. B. Braithwaite, D. H. Mellor (ed.), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge and New York 1980, pp. 87-103.

1981

  1. "Anti-realist Philosophy of Science", Essay review [B. C. Van Fraassen, The Scientific Image, Oxford University Press: Oxford 1980], Nature, 289 (15 January 1981), 207-208.
  2. Review of [Clark Glymour, Theory and Evidence, Princeton University Press: Princeton (NJ) 1980], Isis, 72: 2 (June 1981), 290-291.
  3. "The Hunt for Scientific Reason", Presidential Address in PSA 1980: Proceedings of the 1978 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and R. N. Giere (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1981, pp. 3-22.

1982

  1. "Comments on the Papers of David Bloor and Steven Lukes", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 13: 4 (December 1982), 325-331.
  2. "Science and Objectivity" in Habermas: Critical debates, D. Held and J. Thompson (eds), The MIT Press: Cambridge (MA) and Macmillan: London 1982, pp. 98-115 and 292-293.
  3. "Is There a Quantum World?", Proceedings of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 54 (1982), 133-197.

1983

  1. "Richard Schlegel" (with Arthur Peacock), Physics Today, 36: 8 (August 1983), 79-81.
  2. "Comment on Kuhn's "Commensurability, Comparability, Communicability"" in PSA 1982: Proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and T. Nickels (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.), 1983, pp. 704-711.
  3. "The Cognitive Claims of Metaphor" in Metaphor and Religion: Theolinguistics 2, J.-P. van Noppen (ed.), Studiereeks tijdschrift VUB [Study series of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel], new series, no. 12, Vrije Universiteit Brussel: Brussels 1983, pp. ???-???.
  4. "Cosmology as Myth", Concilium, 166. 1983/6: Project X - Theology and Cosmology (1983), 49-54.

^

1985

  1. "Texts without Types and Lumps without Laws", New Literary History, 17: 1 (Autumn 1985), 31-48.
  2. "Reply to Don Hirsch", New Literary History, 17: 1 (Autumn 1985), 57-60.
  3. "Epistemology without Foundations" in Philosophy, its History and Historiography, A. J. Holland (ed.), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1985, pp. 49-68.
  4. "'Heterodox','Xenodox', and Hermeneutic Dialogue" in Philosophy, its History and Historiography, A. J. Holland (ed.), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1985, pp. 87-90.
  5. "Rationality and the Generalisation of Scientific Style" in The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A. C. Crombie, J. North and J. Rothe (eds), Martinus Nijhoff: Dordrecht 1985, pp. 365-381.

1986

  1. Review of [Wesley C. Salmon, Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World, Princeton University Press: Princeton (NJ) 1980], Isis, 77: 1 (March 1986), 123-124.
  2. "Changing Concepts and Stable Order", Essay Review [H. M. Collins, Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practise, Sage Publications: London 1985], Social Studies of Science, 16: 4 (November 1986), 714-725.
  3. The Construction of Reality (with Michael A. Arbib), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1986.

1987

  1. "Keynes and the Method of Analogy", Topoi, 6: 1 (March 1987), 65-74.
  2. "Ayer and the Philosophy of Science" in Logical Positivism in Perspective: Essays on Language, Truth, and Logic, B. Gower (ed.), Barnes and Noble: Totowa (NJ) 1987, pp. 69-88.
  3. "Socializing Epistemology" in Construction and Constraint: The Shaping of Scientific Rationality, E. McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1988, pp. 97-122; and in Scientific Knowledge Socialized: Selected Proceedings of the 5th Joint International Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science, I. Hronszky, M. Fehér and B. Dajka (eds), Kluwer: Dordercht and Boston 1988, pp. 3-26.
  4. "Unfamiliar Noises II: Tropical talk: The Myth of the Literal", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volumes, 51(1987), 297-311.

1988

  1. "'Rationality' in Science and Morals", Comment on "A Tale of Two Controversies" by Martin Eger, Zygon, 23: 3 (September 1988), 327-332.
  2. "Theories, Family Resemblances and Analogy" in Analogical Reasoning: Perspectives of Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy, D. H. Helman (ed.), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston 1988, pp. 317-340.
  3. "Science beyond Realism and Relativism" in Cognitive Relativism and Social Science, D. Raven, L. van Vucht Tijssen and J. de Wolf (eds), University of Utrecht: Utrecht 1988, pp. 129-143.
  4. "Vico's Heroic Metaphor" in Metaphysics and Philosophy of Science in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Essays in Honour of Gerd Buchdahl, R. Woolhouse (ed.), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston, pp. 185-212.

1989

  1. "Models, Metaphors and Myths", The New York Times, 22 October 1989, sec. 4, p. 24.
  2. "Oltre il relativismo nelle scienze naturali e sociali" [original title: "Beyond Relativism in the Natural and Social Sciences", Italian translation by A. Pagnini], Iride, 3 (July-December 1989), 53-66.

^

1990

1992

  1. "Need a Constructed Reality Be Non-Objective? Reflections on Science and Society" in The End of Science? Attack and Defence, R. Q. Elvee (ed.), University Press of America: Lanham (Md.) 1992, pp. 53-61.
  2. Comment on "Scientific Discovery as Problem Solving" by Herbert Simon, International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, 6: 1 (January 1992), 33-34.

1993

  1. "Models, Metaphors and Truth" in Knowledge and Language, Vol. 3: Metaphor and Knowledge, E. R. Ankersmit and J. J. A. Mooij (eds), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston 1993, pp. 49-66.
  2. "Richard Bevan Braithwaite, 1900–1990", Memoir, Proceedings of the British Academy, 72 (1993), 367-379.
  3. "Fields, tracks and boundaries in the Creakes, North Norfolk", Norfolk Archaeology, 41 (1990/93), 305-324.

1994

  1. "The Sources of Models for God: Metaphysics or Metaphor?" in Physics and Our View of the World, J. Hilgevoord (ed.), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1994.
  2. "How to Be Postmodern without Being a Feminist", The Monist, 77 (1993), 445-461.
  3. "The Anglo-Saxon bounds of Littlebury", Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 83 (1994), 129-139.

^

1995

  1. "Habermas and the Force of Dialectical Argument", History of European Ideas, 21: 3 (May 1995), 367-378.
  2. Review of [James Bell, Reconstructing Prehistory: Scientific Method in Archaeology, Temple University Press: Philadelphia 1994], Antiquity, 59: 263 (June 1995), 420-421.

1997

  1. Review of [Anthony O'Hear, Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1995], Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 51: 2 (July 1997), 344-346.
  2. "The early parish and estate of Ickworth, West Suffolk (with an appendix by Nesta Evans)", Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, 39: Part 1 (1997), 6-27.

1998

1999

^

2000

  1. "Philosophy of Language and the Renewal of Biblical Hermeneutics: Response to Neil B MacDonald", Comment on "How Might the Philosophy of Language Aid the Renewal of Biblical Hermeneutics" by Neil B. MacDonald in Renewing Biblical Interpretation, C. G. Bartholomew, C. J. D. Greene and K. Möller (eds), Paternoster: Carlisle and Zondervan: Grand Rapids (Mich.) 2000.
  2. "Domesday land measures in Suffolk", Landscape History, 22: 1 (January 2000), 21-36.
  3. "Field systems in southwest Cambridgeshire: Abington Pigotts, Litlington and the Mile Ditches", Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 89 (2000), 49-58.

2001

  1. "An Eighteenth-Century Polymath", Review of [David B. Haycock, William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England, ], Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 57: 2 (May 2003), 248-249.
  2. "Medieval field systems and land tenure in South Creake, Norfolk", Norfolk Archaeology, 43 (1998/2001), 79-97.

2003

  1. "How to Be a Postmodernist and Remain a Christian" in After Pentecost: Language and Biblical Interpretation, C. G. Bartholomew, C. J. D. Greene and K. Möller (eds), Paternoster: Carlisle and Zondervan: Grand Rapids (Mich.) 2001.
  2. "Domesday settlement in Suffolk", Landscape History, 25: 1 (January 2003) p. 45-57.

2007

 

 

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

This section orders Hesse's published works by publication type and includes all published versions and translations of any work.
It provides the tables of contents of Hesse's volumes and a list of their reviews that appeared in scholarly journals as well as short notes specifying relevant information on specific publications.

A. Monographs

  1. Science and the Human Imagination: Aspects of the History and Logic of Physical Science, SCM Press: London 1954, 171 pp.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Introduction
        I. Medieval Cosmology
        II. The New Philosophy
        III. The Billiard-ball Universe
        IV. The Outlook of Modern Physics and Mathematics
        V. The Status of Scientific Theories
        VI. The Logical Construction of Scientific Concepts
        VII. Operationalism
        VIII. Scientific Models
        IX. Science and the Natural World
        Epilogue
        Bibliography
    • Reviews:
      • W. A. Whitehouse, Scottish Journal of Theology, 8: 1 (March 1955), 92-94.
        Garrett Hardin, Science, 122: 3171 (7 October 1955), 651.
        D. J. O'Connor, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 6: 24 (February 1956), 347-349.
        Henry W. Johnstone, Jr., Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 16: 3 (March 1956), 428-429.
        H. S. Harris, Philosophy of Science, 23: 3 (July 1956), 268-269.
        T. A. Welton, Physics Today, 9: 8 (August 1956), 39.
        Norwood Russell Hanson, The Philosophical Review, 67: 4 (October 1958), 565-569.
        Jonathan Bennett, The Journal of Symbolic Logic, 25: 1 (March 1960), 74-75.

  2. Forces and Fields: A Study of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics, Thomas Nelson and Sons: London 1961, x+318 pp.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Preface
        I. The Logical Status of Theories
        II. The Primitive Analogies
        III. Mechanism in Greek Science
        IV. The Greek Inheritance
        V. The Corpuscular Philosophy
        VI. The Theory of Gravitation
        VII. Action at a Distance
        VIII. The Field Theories
        IX. The Theory of Relativity
        X. Modern Physics
        XI. The Metaphysical Framework of Physics
        Appendix I
        Appendix II
        Bibliography
        Index of Proper Names
        Index of Subjects
    • Reprints and further editions:
      • Philosophical Library: New York 1962
        Adams Littlefield: Totowa (NJ) 1965
        Greenwood Press: Westport (CT) 1970
        Dover: Mineola (NY) 2005
    • Translations:
      • Italian translation by L. Sosio: Forze e campi : il concetto di azione a distanza nella storia della fisica, Feltrinelli: Milan 1974.
    • Reviews:
      • J. J. M. Reesinck, Synthese, 13: 3 (September 1961), 252-253.
        Edward Rosen, Philosophy of Science, 29: 4 (October 1962), 434-435.
        W. P. D. Wightman, The Philosophical Quarterly, 13: 51 (April 1963), 179-180.
        L. Pearce Williams, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 17: 2 (August 1966), 159-160.

  3. Models and Analogies in Science, Sheed and Ward: London 1963, 150 pp.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Introduction
        1. The Function of Models: A Dialogue
        2. Material Analogy
        3. The Logic of Analogies
        Suggestions for Further Reading
    • Reprints and further editions:
      • Reprinted in C1.
    • Translations:
      • Italian translation in C1.
        Japanese translation in C1.
    • Reviews:
      • Robert Ackermann, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 16: 62 (August 1965), 161-163.
        P. J. M., The Review of Metaphysics, 20: 1 (September 1966), 153.

  4. The Structure of Scientific Inference, Macmillan, London and University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles 1974, pp. vii+309.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Introduction
        1. Theory and Observation     [Reprint of E14]
        2. A Network Model of Universals
        3. The Grue Paradox     [Reprint (in a suitably adapted form) of D25]
        4. The Logic of Induction as Explication
        5. Personalist Probability     [Partial reprint of E20]
        6. Bayesian Confirmation Theory     [Partial reprint of E20]
        7. Universal Generalizations
        8. Finiteness, Laws and Causality     [Partial reprint of E10]
        9. Theory as Analogy     [Pp. 210-222 are a partial reprint of E12]
        10. Simplicity
        11. Maxwell’s Logic of Analogy”     [Reprint of E17]
        12. A Realist Interpretation of Science
        Index of Names
        Index of Subjects
    • Reviews:
      • David Bloor, "Epistemology or Psychology?", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 5: 4 (February 1975), 382-395.
        Jon Dorling, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 26:1 (March 1975), 61-71.
        Risto Hilpinen, The Journal of Philosophy, 72: 15 (4 September 1975), 485-491.
        Robert L. Causey, The Philosophical Review, 85: 1 (January 1976), 137-138
        Noretta Koertge, Isis, 69: 3 (September 1978), 439.

^

B. Co-authored Books

  1. The Construction of Reality (with Michael A. Arbib), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1986.
    • Table of Contents   (* chapters authored by Hesse):
      • Preface
        1. Posing the Problem*
        2. The Intelligence of the Artificial
        3. Schema Theory
        4. Relating Mind and Brain
        5. Freedom*
        6. Freud on Psychology and Religion
        7. Schemas: From rhe Individual to the Social
        8. Language, Metaphor, and a New Epistemology*
        9. Interpretation and Reality*
        10. Religions As Social Schemas*
        11. The Great Schema*
        12. Secular Schemas
        References
        Author Index
    • Reviews:
      • Bruno Latour, Isis, 79: 1 (March 1988), 135-137.
        Richard Swinburne, Philosophy, 62: 242 (October 1987), 542-544.

^

C. Collections of papers

  1. Models and Analogies in Science, Notre Dame University Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1966, 184 pp.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Introduction     [Reprint of A3: Introduction]
        The Function of Models: A Dialogue     [Reprint of A3: Ch. 1]
        Material Analogy     [Reprint of A3: Ch.2]
        The Logic of Analogy     [Reprint of A3: Ch. 3]
        Aristotle's Logic of Analogy     [Reprint of D20]
        The Explanatory Function of Metaphor     [Reprint of E5]
        Suggestions for Further Reading
    • Reviews:
      • Robert Sternfeld, The Quarterly Review of Biology, 43: 1 (March 1968), 63-64.
        Theodore G. Grove, Philosophy & Rhetoric, 3: 3 (Summer 1970), 190-191.

  2. Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science, The Harvester Press: Brighton and Indiana University Press: Bloomington (IN) 1980.
    • Table of Contents:
      • Introduction
        I. The Historiography of Science
            1. Reasons and Evaluations in the History of Science     [Reprint of E16]
            2. The Strong Thesis of Sociology of Science     [Based on D33]
        II. Objectivity and Truth
            3. Theory and Observation     [Reprint of E14]
            4. The Explanatory Function of Metaphor     [Reprint of E5]
            5. Models of Theory-Change     [Reprint of E18]
            6. Truth and the Growth of Scientific Theory     [Reprint of E23]
        III. Pragmatic and Evaluative Knowledge
            7. In Defence of Objectivity     [Reprint of D29]
            8. Theory and Value in the Social Sciences     [Reprint of E25]
            9. Habermas' Consensus Theory of Truth     [Reprint of E26]
        IV. Science and Religion
            10. Criteria of Truth in Science and Theology     [Reprint of D32]
        Bibliography of work by Mary Hesse
        Index
    • Reviews:
      • Roger Trigg, Philosophy, 56: 217 (July 1981), 430-431.
        Edward Manier, Isis, 73: 1 (March 1982), 113-114.
        Keith E. Jones, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 33: 3 (September 1982), 331-334.
        David Bloor, The British Journal for the History of Science, 15: 3 (November 1982), 306-309.
        Paul T. Durbin, The Thomist, 47: 1 (January 1983), 148-151.
        Robert Bunn, Philosophy of Science, 50: 4 (December 1983), 657-659.
        M. H. De Armey, International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, 15: 1-2 (January 1984), 97-98.

^

D. Articles in scholarly journals

  1. "The Calculation of Magnetic Lens Fields by Relaxation Methods", Proceedings of the Physical Society - Section B, 63: 6 (June 1950), 386-401.

  2. "Operational Definition and Analogy in Physical Theories", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 2: 8 (February 1952), 281-294.

  3. "Boole’s Philosophy of Logic", Annals of Science, 8: 1 (March 1952), 61-81.

  4. "Models in Physics", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 198-214.

  5. "Action at a Distance", Abstract, Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Science, 1: 10 (May 1954), 257-258.

  6. "Action at a Distance in Classical Physics", Isis, 46: 4 (December 1955), 337-353.

  7. "Theories, Dictionaries, and Observation", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 33 (May 1958), 12-28.

  8. "A Note on 'Theories, Dictionaries, and Observation'", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 34 (August 1958), 128-129.

  9. "Gilbert and the Historians (I)", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 41 (May 1960), 1-10.

  10. "Gilbert and the Historians (II)", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 42 (August 1960), 130-142.

  11. "On Defining Analogy", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 60 (1959-1960), 79-100.

  12. "On What There Is in Physics", Review of Theories and Things by Rom Harré, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 13: 51 (November 1962), 234-244.

  13. "Subjunctive conditionals II", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volumes, 36 (1962), 201-214.

  14. "History and Philosophy of Science in the Early Natural Sciences Tripos", The Cambridge Review, 84 (1962), 140-145.

  15. "Analogy and Confirmation Theory", Dialectica, 17: 2-3 (September 1963), 284-295.

  16. "A New Look at Scientific Explanation", Review of Metaphysics, 17: 1 (September 1963), 98-108.

  17. "Induction and Theory-structure", Review of Metaphysics, 18: 1 (September 1964), 109-122.

  18. "Analogy and Confirmation Theory", Philosophy of Science, 31: 4 (October 1964), 319-327.

  19. "Resource Letter PhM-1 on Philosophical Foundations of Classical Mechanics", American Journal of Physics, 32: 12 (December 1964), 905-911.

  20. "Aristotle's Logic of Analogy", The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 61 (October 1965), 328-340.
    • Reprinted in C1.
    • Italian translation in C1.
    • Japanese translation in C1.

  21. "Statistical Methods for Inductive logic", Cambridge Research, 1 (1965), 27-30.

  22. "Hooke’s Philosophical Algebra", Isis, 57: 1 (Spring 1966), 67-83.

  23. "Hooke's Vibration Theory and the Isochrony of Springs", Isis, 57: 4 (Winter 1966), 433-441.

  24. "Fine’s Criteria for Meaning Change", Journal of Philosophy, 65: 2 (25 January 1968), 46-52.

  25. "Ramifications of 'Grue'", The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 20: 1 (May 1969), 13-25.
    • Reprinted in a suitably adapted form in A4: Ch. 3.

  26. "Theories and the Transitivity of Confirmation", Philosophy of Science, 37: 1 (March 1970), 50-63.

  27. "Whewell's Consilience of Inductions and Predictions", The Monist, 55: 3 (July 1971), 520-524.

  28. "Probability as the Logic of Science", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, 72 (1971-1972), 257-272.

  29. "In Defence of Objectivity", 1972 Annual Philosophical Lecture, Proceedings of the British Academy, 58 (1973), 275-292.
    • 1972 British Academy Annual Philosophical Lecture.
    • Reprinted in a suitably adapted form in C2: Ch. 7.
    • Japanese translation of its adapted form in C2: Ch. 7.

  30. "Worlds, Selves and Theories", Cambridge Review, 95 (1974), 62-65.

  31. "Bayesianism and Scientific Inference", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 5: 4 (February 1975), 267-272.

  32. "Criteria of Truth in Science and Theology", Religious Studies, 11: 4 (1 December 1975), 385-400.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 10.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 10.

  33. "Models of Method in the Natural and Social Sciences", Methodology and Science, 8 (1975), 163-178.
    • Partially reprinted with the title “The Strong Thesis of Sociology of Science” in C2: Ch. 2.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 2.

  34. "Peacocke's 'Reductionism'", Discussion, Zygon, 11: 4 (December 1976), 335-337.

  35. "The Ideological and Theological Debate about Science: Introduction and a Statement of the Issues", Anticipation: Christian social thought in future perspective, 25 (January 1979), 4-5 and 8-11.

  36. "Is There a Quantum World?", Proceedings of the Royal Institution of Great Britain, 54 (1982), 133-197.

  37. "Cosmology as Myth", Concilium, 166. 1983/6: Project X - Theology and Cosmology (1983), 49-54.

  38. "Texts without Types and Lumps without Laws", New Literary History, 17: 1 (Autumn 1985), 31-48.
    • For Hirsch's comment on this paper and Hesse's reply, see G9.

  39. "Keynes and the Method of Analogy", Topoi, 6: 1 (March 1987), 65-74.

  40. "Tropical talk: The Myth of the Literal", Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volumes, 51 (1987), 297-311.

    • Paper delivered as Hesse's contribution to the symposium "Unfamiliar Noises" at the Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and the Mind Association, University of Cambridge, 12 July 1987, with Richard Rorty as co-symposiast and Susan Haack as Chairman.

  41. "The Cognitive Claims of Metaphor",Journal of Speculative Philosophy, 2 (1988), 1-16.
    • Updated version of E31.

  42. "'Rationality' in Science and Morals", Comment on "A Tale of Two Controversies" by Martin Eger, Zygon, 23: 3 (September 1988), 327-332.

  43. "Oltre il relativismo nelle scienze naturali e sociali" [original titile: "Beyond Relativism in the Natural and Social Sciences", Italian translation by A. Pagnini], Iride, 3 (July-December 1989), 53-66.

  44. "How to Be Postmodern without Being a Feminist", The Monist, 77 (1993), 445-461.

  45. "Fields, tracks and boundaries in the Creakes, North Norfolk", Norfolk Archaeology, 41 (1990/93), 305-324.

  46. "The Anglo-Saxon bounds of Littlebury", Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 83 (1994), 129-139.

  47. "Habermas and the Force of Dialectical Argument", History of European Ideas, 21: 3 (May 1995), 367-378.

  48. "The early parish and estate of Ickworth, West Suffolk (with an appendix by Nesta Evans)", Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, 39: Part 1 (1997), 6-27.

  49. "Domesday land measures in Suffolk", Landscape History, 22: 1 (January 2000), 21-36.

  50. "Field systems in southwest Cambridgeshire: Abington Pigotts, Litlington and the Mile Ditches", Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 89 (2000), 49-58.

  51. "Medieval field systems and land tenure in South Creake, Norfolk", Norfolk Archaeology, 43 (1998/2001), 79-97.

  52. "Domesday settlement in Suffolk", Landscape History, 25: 1 (January 2003) p. 45-57.

  53. "The East Fields of Cambridge", Proceedings of the Cambridge Antiquarian Society, 96 (2007), 143-160.

^

E. Contributions to collections of papers and conference proceedings

  1. "Models and Matter" in Quanta and Reality, S. E. Toulmin (ed.), Hutchinson: London 1962, pp. 49-57.
    • Originally cast in the form of a radio talk (see N1); published for the Nuffield Foundation Unit for the History of Ideas.

  2. "Action at a Distance" in The Concept of Matter, E. McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1963, pp. 372-390.
    • Revision of a paper given at a conference held at the University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame (IN), 5-9 September 1961.
    • Reprinted in: The Concept of Matter in Modern Philosophy, Ernan McMullin (ed.), [reprint of a selection of articles from the second half of the above volume] University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) and London 1978, pp. 119-137.

  3. "Francis Bacon" in A Critical History of Western Philosophy, D. J. O’Connor (ed.), Free Press of Glencoe: New York and Macmillan: London 1964, pp. 141-152.
    • Reprinted with the title "Francis Bacon's Philosophy of Science" in Essential Articles for the Study of Francis Bacon, Brian W. Vickers (ed.), Archen Books/Shoe String Press: Hamden (CT) 1968 and Sidgwick and Jackson: London 1972, pp. 114-139.

  4. "Hooke’s Development of Bacon's Method" in Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of the History of Science, Hermann: Paris 1964, pp. 265-258.

  5. "The Explanatory Function of Metaphor" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science: Proceedings of the 1964 International Congress, Y. Bar-Hillel (ed.), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1966, pp. 249-259.
    • Paper given at the 2nd International Congress for Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Jerusalem 1964, held at Hebrew University of Jerusalem under the joint auspices of the Division of Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science, and the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities.
    • Reprinted in C1.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 4.
    • Italian translation in C1.
    • Japanese translations in C1 and C2: Ch. 4.

  6. "Miracles and the Laws of Nature" in Miracles, C. F. D. Moule (ed.), A. R. Mowbray & Co: London 1965, pp. 33-42.
    • Paper read before the weekly New Testament seminar held at Cambridge University.

  7. "Galileo and the Conflict of Realism and Empiricism' in Atti del Symposium Internazionale di Storia, Metodologia, Logica e Filosofia della Scienza 'Galileo nella Storia e nella Filosofia della Scienza', Gruppo Italiano di Storia delle Scienze: Vinci 1967, pp. 283-28(7)9.
    • Paper given at the Celebrations on the 4th Centenary of Galileo's Birth, Florence-Pisa, 14-16 September 1964.

  8. "A Self-correcting Observation Language" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science III: Proceedings of the Third International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Amsterdam 1967, B. van Rootselaar and J. F. Stahl (eds), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1968, pp. 297-309.
    • Paper given at the 3rd International Congress for Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Amsterdam 1967.

  9. "Consilience of Inductions" in The Problem of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of the International Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 2: Studies in logic and the foundations of mathematics, I. Lakatos (ed.), North-Holland: Amsterdam 1968, pp. 232-246 and pp. 254-257.
    • Paper given at the International Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, Bedford College, London 1965, held under the auspices of the Division of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science of the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science.

  10. "Confirmation of Laws" in Philosophy, Science and Method: Essays in Honor of Ernest Nagel, S. Morgenbesser, P. Suppes and M. White (eds), St. Martin’s Press: New York 1969, pp. 74-79.
    • Partially reprinted in A4: Ch. 8.

  11. "Positivism and the Logic of Scientific Theories" in The Legacy of Logical Positivism for the Philosophy of Science, P. Achinstein and S. Barker (eds), Johns Hopkins Press: Baltimore 1969, pp. 85-114.

  12. "An Inductive Logic of Theories" in Analyses of Theories and Methods of Physics and Psychology, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. IV, M. Radner and S. Winokur (eds), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1970, pp. 164-80.
    • Paper evolved from a conference held at the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science.
    • Partially reprinted in A4: Ch. 9, pp. 210-222.

  13. "Duhem, Quine, and a New Empiricism" in Knowledge and Necessity, Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, Vol. 3, G. Vesey (ed.), Macmillan: London and St. Martin's Press: New York 1970, pp. 191-209.
    • Reprinted in Challenges to Empiricism, Harold Morick (ed.), Wadsworth: Belmont (CA) 1972; Methuen: London and Hackett: Indianapolis 1980.
    • Partially reprinted in A4: Ch. 9, pp. 210-222.
    • Reprinted in Can Theories Be Refuted? Essays on the Duhem-Quine Thesis, Sandra G. Harding (ed.), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1976, pp. 184-204

  14. "Is There an Independent Observation Language?" in The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories, Robert G. Colodny (ed.), University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh 1970, pp. 35-77.
    • Paper based on a lecture given in 1966 within the annual series of public lectures held at the Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Pittsburgh.
    • Reprinted with the title "Theory and Observation" in A4: Ch. 1.
    • Reprinted with the title "Theory and Observation" in C2: Ch. 3.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 3.

  15. "Hermeticism and Historiography: An Apology for the Internal History of Science" in Historical and Philosophical Perspective of Science, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. V, R. H. Stuewer (ed.), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1970, pp. 134-160.

  16. "Reasons and Evaluations in the History of Science" in Changing Perspectives in the History of Science, M. Teich and R. M. Young (eds), Heinemann Educational Books: London 1973, pp. 127-147.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 1.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 1.

  17. "Logic of Discovery in Maxwell's Electromagnetic Theory" in Foundations of Scientific Method in the Nineteenth Century, R. N. Giere and R. S. Westfall (eds), Indiana University Press: Bloomington (Ind.) 1973, 86-114.
    • Paper presented at a conference held in Bloomington, 26-29 November 1970, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at Indiana University.
    • Reprinted with the title "Maxwell's Logic of Analogy" in A4: Ch. 11.

  18. "Models of Theory-change" in Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science IV: Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress, Bucharest, Rumania, August 29-September 4, 1971, P. Suppes, L. Henkin, A. Joja and Gr. C. Moisil (eds), North-Holland Publishing Company: Amsterdam 1973, pp. 379-391.
    • Paper given at the 4th International Congress for Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, Bucharest 1971, jointly sponsored by the Division of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science of the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science and the Academy of the Socialist Republic of Rumania.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 5.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 5.

  19. "Method in Maxwell's Electrodynamics", Proceedings of the XIII International Congress in the History of Science, Section VI, Moscow, August 18-24 1971, Nauka: Moscow 1974, pp. 14-21.

  20. "Bayesian Methods and the Initial Probabilities of Theories" in Induction, Probability, and Confirmation, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. VI, G. Maxwell and R. M. Anderson (eds), University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1975, pp. 50-105.
    • Partially reprinted in A4: Chs 5 and 6.

  21. "Lonergan and Method in the Natural Sciences" in Looking at Lonergan's Method, P. Corcoran (ed.), Gill and MacMillan: Dublin 1975, pp. 59-72.

  22. "On the Alleged Incompatibility between Christianity and Science" in Man and Nature, H. Montefiore (ed.), Collins: London 1975, pp. 121-131.
    • Paper reported from a working group prepared in connection with the Doctrine Commission of the Church of England.

  23. "Truth and the Growth of Scientific Knowledge" in PSA 1976: Proceedings of the 1976 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, F. Suppe and P. D. Asquith (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1976, pp. 261-280.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 6.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 6.

  24. "Models versus Paradigms in the Natural Sciences" in The Use of Models in the Social Sciences, L. Collins (ed.), Tavistock: London and Westview Press: Boulder (CO) 1976, pp. 1-15.
    • Paper presented at a seminar held in July 1972 at the 10th annual meeting of the Seminars Committee of the Faculty of Social Sciences in the University of Edinburgh.

  25. "Theory and Value in the Social Sciences" in Action and Interpretation: Studies in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences, C. Hookway and P. Pettit (eds), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge and New York 1978, pp. 1-16.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 8.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 8.

  26. "Habermas' Consensus Theory of Truth" in PSA 1978: Proceedings of the 1978 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and I. Hacking (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1981, pp. 373-396.
    • Reprinted in C2: Ch. 9.
    • Japanese translation in C2: Ch. 9.

  27. "What Is the Best Way to Assess Evidential Support for Scientific Theories?" in Applications of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of a Conference at the Queen's College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978, L. J. Cohen and M. B. Hesse (eds), Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1980, pp. 202-217.
    • Paper given at a conference at Queen’s College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978.

  28. "A Revised Regularity View of Scientific Laws" in Science, Belief and Behaviour: Essays in Honour of R. B. Braithwaite, D. H. Mellor (ed.), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge and New York 1980, pp. 87-103.

  29. "The Hunt for Scientific Reason", Presidential Address, PSA 1980: Proceedings of the 1978 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and R. N. Giere (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.) 1981, pp. 3-22.

  30. "Science and Objectivity" in Habermas: Critical debates, D. Held and J. Thompson (eds), The MIT Press: Cambridge (MA) and Macmillan: London 1982, pp. 98-115 and 292-293.

  31. "The Cognitive Claims of Metaphor" in Metaphor and Religion: Theolinguistics 2, J.-P. van Noppen (ed.), Studiereeks tijdschrift VUB [Study series of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel], new series, no. 12, Vrije Universiteit Brussel: Brussels 1983, pp. ???-???.
    • Reprinted in an updated version as D41.

  32. "Epistemology without Foundations" in Philosophy, its History and Historiography, A. J. Holland (ed.), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1985, pp. 49-68.
    • Paper presented at the conference on Philosophy and its History organised by the Royal Institute of Philosophy and held at the University of Lancaster in September 1983.

  33. "'Heterodox','Xenodox', and Hermeneutic Dialogue" in Philosophy, its History and Historiography, A. J. Holland (ed.), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1985, pp. 87-90.

  34. "Rationality and the Generalisation of Scientific Style" in The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A. C. Crombie, J. North and J. Rothe (eds), Martinus Nijhoff: Dordrecht 1985, pp. 365-381.

  35. "Ayer and the Philosophy of Science" in Logical Positivism in Perspective: Essays on Language, Truth, and Logic, B. Gower (ed.), Barnes and Noble: Totowa (NJ) 1987, pp. 69-88. Lecture given in early 1986 at the University of Durham to mark the 50th anniversary of the publication of Sir Alfred Ayer’s Language, Truth, and Logic.

  36. "Socializing Epistemology" in Scientific Knowledge Socialized: Selected Proceedings of the 5th Joint International Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science, I. Hronszky, M. Fehér and B. Dajka (eds), Kluwer: Dordercht and Boston 1988, pp. 3-26.
    • Paper given at the 5th Joint International Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science organized by the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science, Veszprém, 1984.
    • Printed also as E37.

  37. "Socializing Epistemology" in Construction and Constraint: The Shaping of Scientific Rationality, E. McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1988, pp. 97-122.
    • Paper presented at a conference held at the University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame (IN) in 1986.
    • Printed also as E36.

  38. "Theories, Family Resemblances and Analogy" in Analogical Reasoning: Perspectives of Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Science, and Philosophy, D. H. Helman (ed.), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston 1988, pp. 317-340.

  39. "Science beyond Realism and Relativism" in Cognitive Relativism and Social Science, D. Raven, L. van Vucht Tijssen and J. de Wolf (eds), University of Utrecht: Utrecht 1988, pp. 129-143.
    • Revised version of a paper presented at an international workshop held in Leusden (NL), 11-12 December 1986.

  40. "Vico's Heroic Metaphor" in Metaphysics and Philosophy of Science in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries: Essays in Honour of Gerd Buchdahl, R. Woolhouse (ed.), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston, pp. 185-212.

  41. "Need a Constructed Reality Be Non-Objective? Reflections on Science and Society" in The End of Science? Attack and Defence, R. Q. Elvee (ed.), University Press of America: Lanham (Md.) 1992, pp. 53-61.
    • Paper given at the XXV Nobel Conference, Gustavus Adolphus College 1989, endorsed by the Nobel Foundation Board.

  42. "Models, Metaphors and Truth" in Knowledge and Language, Vol. 3: Metaphor and Knowledge, E. R. Ankersmit and J. J. A. Mooij (eds), Kluwer: Dordrecht and Boston 1993, pp. 49-66.
    • Paper presented at the Conference on Knowledge and Language held on the occasion of the 375th anniversary of the University of Groningen, 21-25 May 1989.
    • Reprinted in "From a Metaphoric Point of View: A Multidisciplinary approach to the Cognitive Content of Metaphor", Zdravko Radman (ed.), de Gruyter: Berlin 1995, pp. 351-372.

  43. "The Sources of Models for God: Metaphysics or Metaphor?" in Physics and Our View of the World, J. Hilgevoord (ed.), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1994.

  44. "Is Science the New Religion?" in Science Meets Faith: Theology and Science in Conversation, F. Watts (ed.), SPCK: London 1998, pp. 120-135.

  45. "How to Be a Postmodernist and Remain a Christian" in After Pentecost: Language and Biblical Interpretation, C. G. Bartholomew, C. J. D. Greene and K. Möller (eds), Paternoster: Carlisle and Zondervan: Grand Rapids (Mich.) 2001.

^

F. Entries in refrence works

  1. "History of Physics" in American Oxford Encyclopedia, Vol. III, J. J. Little & Ives: New York 1962, pp. ???.

  2. "Action at a Distance and Field Theory' in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. I, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 9-15.

  3. "Ether" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. III, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 66-69.

  4. "Laws and Theories" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. IV, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 404-410.

  5. "Models and Analogy in Science" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. V, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 354-359.

  6. "Simplicity" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. VII, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 445-448.

  7. "Void" in The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, P. Edwards (ed.), Vol. VIII, Macmillan: New York 1967, pp. 217-218.

  8. "Francis Bacon" in Dictionary of Scientific Biography, C. C. Gillespie (ed.), Scribner: New York 1970, Vol. 1, pp. 372-377.

  9. "Models and Analogies" in A Companion to Philosophy of Science, W. H. Newton-Smith (ed.), Blackwell: Oxford 1999, pp. 299-307.

^

G. Reviews

  1. Review of [Edward A. Milne, Sir James Jeans: A Biography, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1952], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 254-256.

  2. Review of [George Boole, Studies in Logic and Probability, R. Rhees (ed.), Watts and Co.: London 1952], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 4: 15 (November 1953), 262-264.

  3. Review of [René Boirel, Science et technique, Éditions du Griffon: Neuchatel (CH) 1955], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 7: 27 (November 1956), 269.

  4. Review of [Hans Reichenbach, The Rise of Scientific Philosophy, University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles 1956], Bulletin of the British Society for the History of Science, 2: 15 (December 1956), 52-53.

  5. Review of [Anatol Rapoport, Operational Philosophy: Integrating Knowledge and Action, Harper & Brothers: New York 1953], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 7: 28 (February 1957), 359-360.

  6. Review of [Ernest H. Hutten, The Language of Modern Physics, George Allen & Unwin: London and Macmillan: New York 1956], Philosophy, 33: 124 (January 1958), 74-75.

  7. Review of [Ernest Nagel, Logic without Metaphysics, and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science, The Free Press: Glencoe (IL) 1956], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 9: 35 (November 1958), 248-249.

  8. Review of [Harold Jeffreys, Scientific Inference, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1957 (Second edition)], Philosophy, 34: 128 (January 1959), 66-68.

  9. Review of [Max Jammer, Concepts of Force: A Study in the Foundations of Dynamics,Harvard University Press: Cambridge (MA) and Oxford University Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 10: 37 (May 1959), 69-73.

  10. Review of [Stephen Toulmin, Ronald W. Hepburn and Alasdair MacIntyre, Metaphysical Beliefs: Three Essays, SCM Press: London 1957] and of [Michael B. Foster, Mystery and Philosophy, SCM Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 10: 37 (May 1959), 73-78.

  11. Review of [Stephen F. Barker, Induction and Hypothesis: A Study of the Logic of confirmation, Cornell University Press: Ithaca (NY) and Oxford University Press: London 1957], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 42 (August 1960), 164-166.

  12. Review of [Mario Bunge, Causality - The Place of the Causal Principle in Modern Science, Harvard University Press: Cambridge (MA) and Oxford University Press: London 1959], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 11: 43 (November 1960), 252-255. <
  13. Review of [Ralph M. Blake, Curt J. Ducasse and Edward H. Madden, Theories of Scientific Method: The Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century, Edward H. Madden (ed.), University of Washington Press: Seattle 1960], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 12: 46 (August 1961), 173-176.

  14. "On What There Is in Physics", Review of [Rom Harré, Theories and Things, Sheed & Ward: London 1961], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 13: 51 (November 1962), 234-244.

  15. Review of [M. Hoskin, William Herschel, Sheed & Ward: London 1959; J. A. Weisheipl, The Development of Physical Theory in the Middle Ages, Sheed & Ward: London 1959; L. K. Clark, Pioneers of Prehistory in England, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; G. Buchdahl, The Image of Newton and Locke in the Age of Reason, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; D. F. Pocock, Social Anthropology, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; E. F. Caldin, The Structure of Chemistry, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; R. Harré, Theories and Things, Sheed & Ward: London 1961; all volumes published within the Newman History and Philosophy of Science Series], History of Science, 1 (1962), 115-117.

  16. Review of [Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Chicago University Press: Chicago 1962], Isis, 54: 2 (June 1963), 286-287.

  17. Review of [Ernest Nagel, The Structure of Science: Problems in the Logic of Scientific Explanation, Routledge & Kegan Paul: London 1961], Mind, N.S. 72: 287 (July 1963), 429-441.

  18. Review of [Milič Čapek, The Philosophical Impact of Contemporary Physics, Van Nostrand: London 1962], The Philosophical Quarterly, 13: 53 (October 1963), 379-381.

  19. "Measurement in Science", Essay Review [Quantification: A History of the Meaning of Measurement in the Natural and Social Sciences, Harry Woolf (ed.), Bobbs-Merrill: Indianapolis (IN) 1961], History of Science, 2 (1963), 152-155.

  20. "Changing Views of Matter", Essay Review [The Concept of Matter, Ernan McMullin (ed.), University of Notre Dame Press: Notre Dame (IN) 1963], History of Science, 3 (1964), 79-84.

  21. Review of [Philosophy of Science: The Delaware Seminar, Vol. I: 1961-1962 by Bernard Baumrin (ed.), John Wiley (Interscience): New York and London 1962], The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 58 (January 1965), 87-89.

  22. Review of [Karl R. Popper, Conjectures and Refutations: The Growth of Scientific Knowledge, Routledge: London 1963], The Philosophical Quarterly, 15: 61 (October 1965), 372-374.

  23. "The Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science", Review of [Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, volume 2, Robert S. Cohen and Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.), Humanities Press: New York 1965], Science, N.S. 152: 3724 (13 May 1966), 918.

  24. Review of [Rom Harré, Matter and Method, Macmillan & Co.: London 1964], The Philosophical Review, 75: 3 (July 1966), 398-400.

  25. Review of [Form and Strategy in Science: Studies Dedicated to Joseph Henry Woodger on the Occasion of his Seventieth Birthday, John R. Gregg and F. T. C. Harris (eds.), Reidel: Dordrecht 1964], The Philosophical Quarterly, 16: 65 (October 1966), 405-406.

  26. Review of [Carl G. Hempel, Aspects of Scientific Explanation; And Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science, The Free Press: New York and Collier-Macmillan: London 1965], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 18: 1 (May 1967), pp. 67-70.

  27. Review of [Robert H. Kargon, Atomism in England from Hariot to Newton, Clarendon Press: Oxford 1966], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 58: 1 (Spring 1967), pp. 123-124.

  28. Review of [L. Pearce Williams, The Origins of Field Theory, Random House: New York 1966], Isis, 18: 2 (August 1967), pp. 330-335.

  29. Review of [Beyond the Edge of Certainty: Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy, Robert G. Colodny (ed.), Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs (NJ) 1965], Ratio, 9 (1967), 91-93.

  30. Review of [Mind, Matter, and Method. Essays in honour of H. Feigl, Paul K. Feyerabend and Grover Maxwell (eds.), University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis 1966, part II: Induction, Confirmation, and Philosophical Method], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 18: 4 (February 1968), pp. 330-335.

  31. Review of [Israel Scheffler, Science and Subjectivity, Bobbs-Merrill: Indianapolis (IN) 1967], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 19: 2 (August 1968), 176-177.

  32. Review Article of [Talk of God: Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, Vol. 2 (1967-1968), Macmillan: London and St. Martin's Press: New york 1969], Philosophy, 44: 170 (October 1969), 343-349.

  33. Review of [The Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Paul Edwards (ed.), Macmillan and The Free Press: New York and Collier-Macmillan: London 1967], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 20: 3 (October 1969), 13-25.

  34. Review of [Pierre Duhem, To save the Phenomena, University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London 1969], The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 21: 3 (August 1970), 303-304.

  35. Review of [Leszek Kolakowski, The Alienation of Reason: A History of Positivist Thought, Anchor Books (Doubleday): Garden City (NY) 1969], Isis, 65: 1 (March 1974), 103-104.

  36. Review of [Peter Achinstein, Law and Explanation: An Essay in the Philosophy of Science, Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1971], Isis, 65: 2 (June 1974), 259-260.

  37. Review of [Michael Krausz, Critical Essays on the Philosophy of R. G. Collingwood, Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1972], Isis, 65: 2 (June 1974), 290.

  38. Review of [Maurice A. Finocchiaro, History of Science as Explanation, Wayne State University Press: Detroit 1973], The British Journal for the History of Science, 7: 2 (July 1974), 180-182.

  39. Review of [John Losee, A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science, Oxford University Press: Oxford, London, New York 1972], Isis, 65: 3 (September 1974), 402-403.

  40. Review of [Martin Strauss, Modern Physics and Its Philosophy, Reidel: Dordrecht 1972], Isis, 65: 3 (September 1974), 404.

  41. Review of [The Problem of Scientific Realism, Edward A. MacKinnon (ed.), Appleton-Century-Crofts: New York 1972], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 528.

  42. Review of [Philosophy, Science, and Method: Essays in Honor of Ernest Nagel, Sidney Morgenbesser, Patrick Suppes and Morton White (eds.), St. Martin's Press: New York 1969], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 528-529.

  43. Review of [Mendel Sachs, The Field Concept in Contemporary Science, Charles C. Thomas: Springfield (IL) 1973], Isis, 65: 4 (December 1974), 529.

  44. Review of [Stephen Lukes, Émile Durkheim, His Life and Work: A Historical and Critical Study, Harper & Row: New York 1972], Isis, 66: 2 (June 1975), 288.

  45. Review of [Ian Hacking, The Emergence of Probability: A Philosophical Study of Early Ideas about Probability, Induction and Statistical Inference, Cambridge University Pess: London and New York 1975], Isis, 67: 4 (December 1976), 288.

  46. "Anti-realist Philosophy of Science", Essay review [B. C. Van Fraassen, The Scientific Image, Oxford University Press: Oxford 1980], Nature, 289 (15 January 1981), 207-208.

  47. Review of [Clark Glymour, Theory and Evidence, Princeton University Press: Princeton 1980], Isis, 72: 2 (June 1981), 290-291.

  48. Review of [Wesley C. Salmon, Scientific Explanation and the Causal Structure of the World, Princeton University Press: Princeton (NJ) 1980], Isis, 77: 1 (March 1986), 123-124.

  49. "Changing Concepts and Stable Order", Essay Review [H. M. Collins, Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practise, Sage Publications: London 1985], Social Studies of Science, 16: 4 (November 1986), 714-725.

  50. Essay Review [Philip Clayton, Explanation from Physics to Theology: An Essay in Rationality and Religion, Yale University Press: New Haven (CT) 1989, pp. 230], CTNS Bulletin, 11: 2 (Spring 1991), 39-40.

  51. Review of [James Bell, Reconstructing Prehistory: Scientific Method in Archaeology, Temple University Press: Philadelphia 1994], Antiquity, 59: 263 (June 1995), 420-421.

  52. Review of [Anthony O'Hear, Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1995], Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 51: 2 (July 1997), 344-346.

  53. "An Eighteenth-Century Polymath", Review of [David B. Haycock, William Stukeley: Science, Religion and Archaeology in Eighteenth-Century England, ], Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, 57: 2 (May 2003), 248-249.

^

H. Comments and discussions

  1. Commentary on "Intellectual Actors in the Background of Analysis by Probabilities" by C. C. Gillespie, in Scientific Change, A. C. Crombie (ed.), Heinemann: London and Basic Books: New York 1963, pp. 471-476. Symposium on the History of Science held at the University of Oxford, July 9-15, 1961, under the auspices of the Division of History of Science of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science.

  2. Comment on "On the Notion of Field in Newton, Maxwell, and Beyond" by Howard Stein, in Historical and Philosophical Perspective of Science, Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. V, Roger H. Stuewer (ed.), University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis 1970, p. 298.

  3. Comment on "The Object of Explantion" by P. Achinstein, in Explanation, S. Körner (ed.), Basil Blackwell: Oxford and Yale University Press: New Haven (CT) 1975, pp. 45-54.

  4. Commentray on "The Preconditions of Experience and the Unity of Physics" by C. F. von Weizsäcker, in Transcendental Arguments and Science, P. Bieri, R. P. Horstmann and L. Krüger (eds), Reidel: Dordrecht and Boston 1979, pp. 159-170. Paper originally presented at a symposium held in July 1977, and sponsored by the Center for Interdisciplinary Research of the University of Bielefeld.

  5. "Minogue on Intensional Reference", Philosophy of Science, 47: 4 (December 1980), 617-625.
    • Reply to Brendan P. Minogue, "Realism and Intensional Reference", Philosophy of Science, 45: 3 (September 1978), 445-455.

  6. Comment on "Properties, Causation, and Projectibility" by S. S. Shoemaker in Applications of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of a Conference at the Queen's College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978, L. J. Cohen and M. B. Hesse (eds), Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1980, pp. 329-330.

  7. "Comments on the Papers of David Bloor and Steven Lukes", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 13: 4 (December 1982), 325-331.
    • Comment on David Bloor, "Durkheim and Mauss Revisited: Classification and the Sociology of Knowledge", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 13: 4 (December 1982), 267-297.
    • Comment on Steven Lukes, "Comments on David Bloor", Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, 13: 4 (December 1982), 313-318.

  8. "Comment on Kuhn's "Commensurability, Comparability, Communicability"", PSA 1982: Proceedings of the 1982 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2: Symposia and Invited Papers, P. D. Asquith and T. Nickels (eds), Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing (Mich.), 1983, pp. 704-711.

  9. "Reply to Don Hirsch", New Literary History, 17: 1 (Autumn 1985), 57-60.
    • Reply to E. D. Hirsch, Jr., "On Theories and Metaphors: A Comment on Mary Hesse's Paper", New Literary History, 17: 1 (Autumn 1985), 49-55.      [Comment on D38]

  10. Comment on "Scientific Discovery as Problem Solving" by Herbert Simon, International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, 6: 1 (1992), 33-34.

  11. "Philosophy of Language and the Renewal of Biblical Hermeneutics: Response to Neil B MacDonald", Comment on "How Might the Philosophy of Language Aid the Renewal of Biblical Hermeneutics" by Neil B. MacDonald in Renewing Biblical Interpretation, C. G. Bartholomew, C. J. D. Greene and K. Möller (eds), Paternoster: Carlisle and Zondervan: Grand Rapids (Mich.) 2000.

^

I. Forewards, prefaces, and introductions

  1. "Introduction" in Human Implications of Scientific Advance: Proceedings of the XV International Congress of the History of Science, E. G. Forbes (ed.), Edinburgh University Press: Edinburgh 1978, pp. 59-63.
    • Introduction to a symposium on "Internal and external causation of scientific ideas", XV International Congress on the History of Science, Edinburgh, 10-15 August 1977.

^

J. Biographies, obituaries, and memorial minutes

  1. "Richard Schlegel" (with Arthur Peacock), Physics Today, 36: 8 (August 1983), 79-81.

  2. "Richard Bevan Braithwaite, 1900–1990", Memoir, Proceedings of the British Academy, 72 (1993), 367-379.

^

K. Co-edited books

  1. Applications of Inductive Logic: Proceedings of a Conference at the Queen's College, Oxford, 21-24 August 1978, L. J. Cohen and M. B. Hesse (eds.), Clarendon Press: Oxford and Oxford University Press: New York 1980.

^

L. Interviews

  1. "Come nascono le teorie scientifiche" [Interview by Marco Dorato; published in Italian], Prometeo, 11 (September 1985), 94-100.

^

M. Articles in the popular press

  1. "Models, Metaphors and Myths", The New York Times, 22 October 1989, sec. 4, p. 24.

^

N. Radio talks

  1. "Models and Matter" [Part of the series "Quanta and Reality"], BBC Radio 3, 24 May 1961, 8:00 pm (20 min.).
    • Published as E1.

 

 

CRITICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Critical Bibliography includes secondary literature on Hesse's life and work
(with the exception of the reviews of Hesse's volumes which are listed
under each volume in the Annotated Bibliography).


 

 

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I knew Mary Hesse for over forty years, from my first sabbatical in Cambridge back in the early 1970s. What I remember about her above all was her warmth and friendliness. Our last meeting was in 2009, when I was passing through Cambridge with my daughter Emily, then aged about 23. Mary invited us to her flat for a glass of sherry, and I remember her putting Emily at her ease and asking her about her life and her hopes. Just a very decent person and I can think of no higher praise than that.

Michael Ruse, 10 October 2016

I am most eager to make contact with Mary Hesse. I was a student at Free School lane around 1960 when Cambridge was the only university that offered a course in the History and Philosophy of Science. There were three on the staff: Mary Hesse, Buchdahl and Hopkins. All remembered with affection and respect but Hesse in particular. I am seeking some way of reaching her.

Anthony Blake, 7 July 2016

Mary Hesse took me under her wing as a research student in 1972 and, although I was not her greatest success, I did learn to love and respect her deeply as a person and as a philosopher.

Dr Graeme Robertson, 1 June 2016

I just purchased a signed copy of Forces and Fields: A Study of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics, Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1961. I was struck by three rare attributes that distinguish her work:
1. her grasp of the power and limits of abstraction to provide a framework for perceived realities;
2. her ability to craft such a framework and apply it as a selective lens for revealing historical relations; and
3. her ability to find expression for her perceptions after the manner of Locke: "...gentle steps, things ascend upwards in degrees of perfection."
Thank you for your work in maintaining a tribute worthy of such passionate inspiration. Reading Mary Hesse changed the way I understand the world and society. A profoundly earthshattering experience.

Mark Estes (Austin, Texas), 11 April 2010

I have read Mary Hesse's books and have been profoudly influenced by her. I have included something about her in one of my books.

Calvin S. Kalman, 21 October 2009

Reading Mary Hesse changed the way I understand the world and society. A profoundly earthshattering experience.

Erik Ringmar, 19 March 2006

Ho letto della prof. Hesse il libro "Modelli e analogie nella scienza"; di non facile comprensione ma di grande interesse!
Grazie.

Giuseppe Canducci, 20 January 2006

As a science teacher, I appreciate the statement made in "Science and the Human Imagination" which states,"God is in Heaven and man is upon the earth...and men must not presume to the transcendence and objectivity of God." The statement assists us in forming our understanding of the place of Quantum physics. Thank you.

Mrs. Lory Pyle Hundt, 2 May 2005

I dont kno who this site is about but i think its great that people have made this site! She obviously has done somthing great! This is so mad!

K. Eagleton, 13 February 2005

Nice page

John, 21 January 2005

Estou estudando analogias na Quimica com alguns artigos de Mary Hesse. Gostaria de receber mais informações sobre o livro Models and Analogies in Science.
Um abraço

Jorge Luis Freitas, aluno do Mestrado em Ensino, Filosofia e Historia da Ciência, UFBa-BAHIA-BRASIL, 24 November 2004

Dr. Jitse van der Meer, 26 November 2003

For many years Mary Hesse has been my guide in things philosophical. I'm not sure that I always agree with her, but then again I have difficulty understanding many of the things she writes about. I'd like to read about her views on miracles, but haven't got my hands on those writings where she deals with such things.
I'm really pleased to see this site dedicated to her work.
Best wishes,

Graham Eagleton, 16 November 2003

I was Mary's advisee in the MPhil program in HPS at Cambs in 1980-81; she supervised my master's thesis criticizing the pragmatic antirealism of Davidson and Rorty (the latter an undergraduate teacher of mine). She was unfailingly fair and tough-minded, an excellent teacher with a dry sense of humor. At the time I was rather red, and I recall at one point, when I was expressing incredulity that anyone could accept the Davidson-Rorty conclusion that most of our beliefs must be true, she remarked that there's one thing that Christians and Marxists share, which is an appreciation for the limitless capacity of humans for error. She invited me to stay on for the PhD, but I returned to the US to complete my degree at Michigan, and I lost contact with her. I have always remembered her with affection and appreciation, and am pleased to see that someone has set up a website in her honor.

Justin Schwartz, Esq. (PhD, JD), 11 July 2003

All best wishes, Mary, for many more healthy and productive years. You are a model for us all.

Menachem Fisch, 22 May 2003

Live long and prosper.

Joseph Agassi, 5 May 2003

Best wishes to Miss Hesse, and thanks for this great webpage.

Hyung Jae Chun, 29 April 2003

This is a splendid place to visit--informative and inspiring.

Professor Gerard Smith, 9 April 2003

John Fox, 7 April 2003

Mary Hesse is a remarkable thinker, and one who has influenced my own work in Political Science and Political philosophy.

Joseph Harder, 5 April 2003

Very nice and informative set of web pages. Much new information that I was not previously aware of.

Dr. Eric Scerri, UCLA, 4 April 2003

Thank you for this beautiful site.

Prof Ambrogio Fassina, 4 April 2003

Best wishes to Prof. Hesse from a grateful reader in theoretical psychology.

Dr. Marvin McDonald, 4 April 2003

Her writings are helpful to correlate with models of the mind in which the British Psychoanalytic tradition excels. Very appropriate web site.

Phyllis Thurstone, MD, 6 March 2003

I remember Miss Hesse at Cambridge in 1972-73, providing some stimulating lectures on philosophical problems in modern physics, and also as a helpful, patient and wise counsellor for my (not terribly good) final-year dissertation. I also spent hours in the University Library reading her books Forces and Fields and Science and the Human Imagination.
She wrote, lectured and talked in a way that conveyed authority and complete conviction, and also a penetrating, almost awe-inspiring, insight into nature and the ways we have of finding out about it.

Mr Ian Watson, 8 February 2003

Luigi Lentini, (Prof., Università "Ca' Foscari" Venezia), 26 October 2002

Great looking site in honour of a very interesting and admirable person -- thank you!

Gaz, 21 October 2002

I've only had time to have a quick look at the website you have made for Mary, but it is a most impressive and attractive project. Thank you for doing this.

Peter (Prof. Peter Lipton, Head of the Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge), 19 October 2002

 

 

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